Learning from Your Project X  Launching and piloting  Your Project X  was a phenomenal experience. I am so grateful for the Boston Founding Fellows, the first participants in our Boston Career Change pilot. It takes courage to be first.  I'm excited about the turns that YPX is taking. This project is right where it needs to be, the team is learning and iterating, it is practicing what we preach.  After a lot of personal reflection, I have decided to step out of the project. I have full confidence in this idea, I love the team that is bringing it together, and I know that it will iterate its way into something pretty amazing.  It's just not the path for me. I'm headed in a different direction (stay tuned for more!) It takes trying something on to learn whether it is for you or not. This posture is integral to the Evolutionary Leadership Framework.  I am very glad to know that  Jeff and Yulia  remain committed to building the Boston community. And I’m looking forward to seeing what comes out of  the Camp X weekend  this month.  Working with the YPX leadership team, meeting the Boston Founding Fellows, witnessing the way people come together to change and to create -  that and all the lessons that I personally learned have made this a worthy experiment.  Here is to what’s next.

Learning from Your Project X

Launching and piloting Your Project X was a phenomenal experience. I am so grateful for the Boston Founding Fellows, the first participants in our Boston Career Change pilot. It takes courage to be first.

I'm excited about the turns that YPX is taking. This project is right where it needs to be, the team is learning and iterating, it is practicing what we preach.

After a lot of personal reflection, I have decided to step out of the project. I have full confidence in this idea, I love the team that is bringing it together, and I know that it will iterate its way into something pretty amazing.

Extracting Attention

Extracting Attention

It was many years back that I read Kevin Kelly say “your attention is your currency.” The futurist technologist was defining the most sought after asset of this new economy - your attention. Now of course that has always been true. We would not be drowning in ads and billboards without this aggressive competition for our attention.

But the supercomputers in our pocket and the unprecedented amount of intimate, personal data that we now willingly give away, mean that our attention is literally being mined. It is being extracted from us.

Tristan Harris gave a powerful TED Talk on this very topic. I encourage you to take the 16 minutes and watch it. Your thoughts are being shaped by someone else.

Evolutionary Leadership Workshop

Evolutionary Leadership Workshop

We are off to the third annual Evolutionary Leadership Workshop. Here is a note to the participants:

You have probably had a set of landmark experiences in your life. You have had moments that you refer back to over and over again, you have had realizations that continue to feed you. Our goal is to craft another one of those experiences. We want the Evolutionary Leadership Workshop to become a landmark moment in your life. Our intention is to support you as you reach deep alignment with yourself and with your own highest purpose.  We want you to return home with a new community of people and a concrete set of steps that will launch you into what is next for you.  We want you to actualize your dream, we want to enroll you in the evolutionary movement of our time.

       Love What You Do or Do Something Else   I am thrilled to announce the launch of  Your Project X ! It is my latest effort to help people (re)discover their passions and build careers they’ll love.  You know I’ve devoted my life to helping people do the work that matters most. I cannot think of a more important moment to tap our creative impulse and do what our hearts are here to do.  I am excited by the ongoing success of the  Evolutionary Leadership Workshop . But not everyone can get away to a magical island for an intensive seven days. So here is  Your Project X .  We run 10 week part-time programs in New York City and Boston designed to help participants accelerate change in their careers -- by amplifying what they are already doing, breaking into a new industry or founding a company.  What I’m most excited about is nurturing a new community of doers. I’m looking forward to helping forge authentic connections among folks who dare say “YES” to their dream. The rigor of small steps, mutual accountability, relentless experimentation and the vibrancy of community. This is how we thrive at the dawn of a new day.  You know someone who is ready,  let them know about this .  Or maybe now it’s YOUR turn!  Thank you for spreading the word.     Saludos,  Gibrán

Love What You Do or Do Something Else

I am thrilled to announce the launch of Your Project X! It is my latest effort to help people (re)discover their passions and build careers they’ll love.

You know I’ve devoted my life to helping people do the work that matters most. I cannot think of a more important moment to tap our creative impulse and do what our hearts are here to do.

I am excited by the ongoing success of the Evolutionary Leadership Workshop. But not everyone can get away to a magical island for an intensive seven days. So here is Your Project X.  We run 10 week part-time programs in New York City and Boston designed to help participants accelerate change in their careers -- by amplifying what they are already doing, breaking into a new industry or founding a company.

Addicted to Outrage

Addicted to Outrage

Tim Ferriss shared Daniel Ketchell’s Medium piece breaking down our current media environment. It is an excellent exposition of the way a relatively neutral or even positive story is funnelled towards negativity and outrage. It’s really worth checking out.

Here is a quote that stood out for me –

There is probably an evolutionary reason for the virality of outrage, but I’m not a scientist, so I’ll use a simple, light example. Have you ever seen anyone scream at a sports bar or stadium full of strangers about a logical and sound referee decision?

Outrage encourages interaction and engagement, the fuel of our social networks. So outrage, too often, becomes the narrative — or at least skews the narrative.

All About The Heart

All About The Heart

Thomas Friedman launched a recent column reminding us that automation will define the future:

Software has started writing poetry, sports stories and business news. IBM’s Watson is co-writing pop hits. Uber has begun deploying self-driving taxis on real city streets and, last month, Amazon delivered its first package by drone to a customer in rural England.

He also reminds us that there is nothing that competes with the human heart. It is only the heart that can can love, have compassion and dream. He reminds us that only humans can build deep relationships of trust.

Your Image Of God

I’m a believer. Not the uptight fundamentalist type. I’m well over the idea of God as an old man in the skies waving a magic wand. But I believe. I have a cosmology that helps me to live into the infinite vastness of this great mystery.

 

I imagine a tantric dance between what is quiet, perfect and still and what is full, unfolding manifestation. What we might call the “ground of being” and what we might call “evolution.”

 

I don’t just hold these as intellectual abstractions. I seek to be in relationship with the divine. I work with the names and forms of teachers and deities. I look where other humans have looked before and I aim to see myself as an integral part of it all.

 

I don’t have any need to push these ideas on anyone. But I do agree with the Richard Rohr quote that Casper ter Kuile recently shared:

Good theology is still important. Your image of God creates you. You become the God you worship. If your God is an eternal torturer, then torture is validated. If God is presented in the image of a king, then we’ll all want to be kings. If God is love and relationality that creates a very different kind of humanity.

Secularism has been a liberating force. But it also left us with a false binary. You are either a religious fundamentalist of some stripe or other, or you are a rational person who is part of a cosmic accident. Today, thankfully, we have the rise of the “spiritual but not religious” crowd that is doing all sort of things to tend to our spiritual longing.

The question matters. Even if you are not a believer. Like Wade Davis says, we, each of us humans, each of our cultures, all of us are caught in the same predicament, trying to answer the same question - “how did we get here and why are we here?”

Your answer to that question is impacting how you live. It is impacting what you contribute to our culture. And it is impacting your commitment to the future.

2016 Mattered

There is a narrative out there that 2016 was the worst year ever. Not only did we lose beloved icons ranging from Prince to Carrie Fisher, but the United States just handed the Nuclear Codes to the least qualified individual ever to hold the Presidency. And this is without talking about his white supremacist tendencies!

I am the last person to deny the very real implications that our political choices will have on very real people.

At the same time I find it important to agree with Charles Nevin’s recent opinion in the NY Times. We have done much, much worse.

If we stay on this side of the Atlantic, we must consider the devastating implications of 1492 for the indigenous population of the Americas. It took less than 50 years for the first slave ship to land in the continent in in 1526. Think about the implications for millions of Africans and their surviving descendants. The year 1898  is a bit closer to ours, and we can call that the birth of American Imperialism as it grabbed the reins from Spain in the Spanish American War.

I hold the passionate understanding that we are the most privileged people to have ever walked the earth. We are our ancestors’ wildest dream! It is imperative that we hold on to this truth even in the advent of dark times.

2016 was a year that truly mattered. We will have to meet its implications for years to come. I believe it’s best to do so with an awareness of history. We cannot forget where we come from and how much we have achieved.

We take hits.

And we move forward.

Addicted to Outrage

Tim Ferriss shared Daniel Ketchell’s Medium piece breaking down our current media environment. It is an excellent exposition of the way a relatively neutral or even positive story is funnelled towards negativity and outrage. It’s really worth checking out.

Here is a quote that stood out for me -

There is probably an evolutionary reason for the virality of outrage, but I’m not a scientist, so I’ll use a simple, light example. Have you ever seen anyone scream at a sports bar or stadium full of strangers about a logical and sound referee decision?

Outrage encourages interaction and engagement, the fuel of our social networks. So outrage, too often, becomes the narrative — or at least skews the narrative.

What if this is true?

We know that human beings are wired for connection. We know that the irony of the internet age is that while we are more connected than ever we are also more isolated than ever.

Our human essence is longing for connection.

Outrage encourages interaction and engagement. And even more importantly, it allows us to bond with our tribe.

There is A LOT to be outraged about. The planet burns, injustice abounds and the rich are still hoarding. Outrage is the fuel that got Trump elected. It is also the fuel that gives life to the resistance.

But I have seen the way that calls for justice can so easily give birth to righteous mobs that will not be appeased until they see a head has rolled and a person finished. I have seen the cruelty of outrage, its powerful blinding force. I’m not saying there is no place for it. But I am proposing we are addicted to it. It is a lot like caffeine, it gives a strong boost and ends with a hard drop.

I used to think outrage was just turning righteous about being right. But today I’m wondering something else. What if it’s just what we turn to because we long to connect? What if healthier forms of connection feel riskier, too vulnerable, and we haven’t honed those skills. What if what we are trying to do is bond and engage, but we are doing it with empty carbs when what we really need is whole health?