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About

 

Gibrán is an internationally renowned master facilitator who has devoted his life to the development of leaders and organizational transformation.

Gibrán's work is anchored by the idea of Evolutionary Leadership. It is about consciousness and culture. It is about action through relentless experimentation. It is about adaptability and working with complexity.

The commitment is to bring great people together to do work that changes everything. We are committed to justice and we are committed to creative possibility. We are talking about our next evolutionary leap. We want to do work that moves us beyond the climate crisis and towards a new and generative economy. This work is about a just transition. We want to be a part of defining new ways for us to be together in this world.

Here are some of Gibrán’s current clients, and here are some testimonials.

To book Gibrán as an Organizational Consultant, Facilitator, or Speaker, contact him here

  • Featured post

    Glenn Beck is a Person

    Glenn Beck is not on Fox anymore. Many of us don’t hear from him as much. But his media empire is growing. I remember when he was front and center in the imagination of the progressive movement. He was the embodiment of evil. The mouthpiece of the right. I heard more about him than from him. And what I heard was all bad. I remember the intense Color of Change video that so clearly demonstrated Beck’s race bating. I also remember sitting on an airplane and catching a Glenn Beck episode on TV (I don’t own one). He was poking fun at Al Gore and An Inconvenient Truth. I saw him deny climate change. Hard to see how this guy is anything other than a really bad guy. Stoking racial fears? Denying climate change? That was years ago.
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    The Six Hour Work Day

    In the US it is common to make fun of the French and their unions, their strikes and their 35 hour work weeks. It is easy to forget that the unions are indeed “the folks who brought you the weekend.” I was excited to read Sweden is introducing the six hour work day. Our relationship to work is all wrong. It is by now a cliché to say that too many of us live to work instead of work to live. But it is true. We have left our children to be taken care of by iPads, and we have limited our own lives to an idea of “productivity” that has simply come up short. Too many of us are not happy.
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    Your Own Myth

    I watched Hercules last night. The terrible B movie starring “The Rock.” Don’t ask me how I ended up here. I sat through the annoyance of cliché after cliché. It wasn’t until the movie was done that I got some value from it. Samantha, my wife, who finds something to appreciate in everything, was the one to point it out. In this version of Hercules he is actually an orphan passing himself off as the son of Zeus. His mercenary friends include a storyteller whose job it is to amplify the myth of Hercules, to tell of his seven mythical labors, to stir fear among his enemies and loyalty among friends. None of it is actually true.
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  • Featured post

    Victimhood Culture

    As a person of color I have experienced direct and explicit aggression as well as significant forms of exclusion. I also experience plenty of microaggressions. As a man who has been culturally conditioned by patriarchy, I have also been the perpetrator of explicit and implicit aggressions. I have been hurt and I have hurt others. It is unfortunate that we have structured a society in which the power embedded in relationships of race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, exclusion and privilege define so much of our human experience. There are few things uglier than the oppression olympics, elaborate arguments to understand who is more oppressed than who. But the fact is that some groups are more oppressed than others. One could probably come up with an algorithm to sort out everyone’s place on the ladder of privilege and oppression.  
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    Times for Connection

    We are social animals. We cannot be an isolated self. Affluence allows us to become more and more independent from each other. It allows us to isolate ourselves. This is the big irony. We are “wealthier” than most people on earth yet we are lonelier than most people on earth. The “stuff” that we buy with our wealth, the “safety” that we buy with our wealth, the “independence” that we buy with our wealth, it all seems to diminish the very thing that gives life meaning - the generative power of human connection. Our wealth is making us scared. Depressed. And small. David Brooks wrote an awesome column about The Great Affluence Fallacy:  
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  • Featured post

    The Little Prince

    We just watched the new take on “The Little Prince” that Netflix released on Friday. I found it beautiful. I loved the art. And I loved the “story within a story.” It is a great way to bring grown ups back to the magic of a fable that we learned to love as children. I bring it up because the new version offers a sharp critique of a world defined by corporations, “productivity” and standardized education. It reminds us that the most precious things in life cannot be dominated or owned. It reminds us that we have lost too much. “It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye” Save
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  • Featured post

    Self Righteous

    I’ve been struggling with “movement space.” It feels like the people who are devoting our lives to social transformation are also burdened by an unconscious shadow. This shadow takes the form of judgement and self-righteousness. The rush to indict and exile is not exclusively applied to “the other.” It’s not just the bad guys who are wrong. The whip of self-righteousness is increasingly applied to those who are in movement with us. The slightest mistake, the smallest breach of dogma, the mis-stating of something, too often leads to condemnation. It is difficult to be creative in this space. We can’t think beyond our constraints when we're constantly afraid of screwing up. Ironically, the dynamic smells a lot like what I’ve experienced in a fundamentalist church. We are right and everyone else is wrong.   Save Save
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  • Featured post

    We The Picture Makers

    The traditional activist tends to come at you. It is a straightforward charge backed up by righteousness and facts. It is a worthy passionate stance. And it has its limitations. The artist comes at you sideways. Good art sneaks up on you. You feel it before you think it. Frederick Douglass made masterful use of photography. A new art and a new technology. David Brooks explains how Douglass used portraits of his dignified self to redraw people’s unconscious mental maps. He was erasing old associations about blackness and replacing them with new ones... he was taking an institution like slavery, which had seemed to many so inevitable, and leading people to perceive it as arbitrary. He was creating a new ideal of a just society and a fully alive black citizen, and therefore making current reality look different in the light of that ideal. “Poets, prophets and reformers are all picture makers — and this ability is the secret of their power and of their achievements,” Douglass wrote. This is where artists make their mark, by implanting pictures in the underwater processing that is upstream from conscious cognition. Walidah Imarisha makes a similar point in her introduction to Octavia’s Brood - “Whenever we envision a world without war, without prisons, without capitalism, we are producing speculative fiction.”   What happens when we start to understand ourselves as artists? How does our posture change? What does our work look like when it seeks to impact culture? How do we claim the role of “cultural creatives”? What practices allow us to become better at the art of making pictures - new pictures, pictures of a more just world, a world that optimizes life at the intersection of love and freedom?
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    Herstory

    I teared up this morning when I saw clips of Hillary’s nomination. We made herstory last night. And IT MATTERS. Every time a glass ceiling is broken it matters. Every time women or people of color can see themselves reflected in a position of influence and power it matters. Patriarchy is real. Racism is real. Breaking through is something that matters. I voted for Bernie Sanders. His solidly progressive stance and his refusal of corporate money were enough to seal the deal for me. But I have never been seduced by the idea that the liberation that we seek will come from a president. Not from Bernie, not from Obama, not from Hillary. Yes. The presidency matters. The climate, the supreme court, whether war or peace. But let us not lose sight that when we vote for president what we are actually doing is helping to shape the field of struggle. Our work is on the ground. Our work is shifting culture. Our work is in turning to one another, it is in challenging the state and its corporate oligarchy while persistently, rebelliously, passionately lifting each other. Once we accept that at this stage of the presidential election what we have in our hands is a battle between a moderate and a scare-mongering narcissist, then our choice is pretty straight forward. Aware of her moderate politics, we can take a look at the first woman nominee for a major political party of these United States and face the fact that never has anyone been more prepared to take the mantle of the presidency. It behooves us to recognized that she is being held to a standard that no male candidate has ever been held to. Her experience, her pragmatism and yes, her understanding of power, are all important qualifiers for that role. And yet we cannot accept her. If you don’t think that patriarchy is not at the heart of the animosity towards Hillary Clinton, then you are simply in denial. And this is precisely why it matters that we, all of us who are part of the history of this nation, made herstory yesterday night. Save
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    Empire and Climate

    “Humans are killing the planet.” How many times have you heard that? How many times have you said it? I know that I often have. I was recently struck by a powerful challenge to that assertion. Who exactly is killing the planet and why are we all taking the blame for it? I acknowledge that all of us in the “rich” world benefit from the comforts of an eco-cidal economy. And that this is increasingly true in rapidly industrializing nations. But it is not humans that are killing the planet. It is an ideology. The planet is being decimated by an industrial, extractive ideology that is also imperialistic. It seeks to organize the whole world around greed, unsustainable “growth,” a global finance casino, and corporate oligarchy dominated by 1% of the population. SOME humans are killing the planet. They are making us in their image. We are complicit because it is more comfortable to be complicit, and the poor are complicit because it’s their only choice. Ta-Nehisi Coates refers to these humans as “dreamers,” and he connects their ideology to the same ideology that makes slavery possible. It is all part of the same imperialist thread. And it is our role to undo it. Once, the Dream’s parameters were caged by technology and by the limits of horsepower and wind. But the Dreamers have improved themselves, and the damming of seas for voltage, the extraction of coal, the transmuting of oil into food, have enabled an expansion in plunder with no known precedent. And this revolution has freed the Dreamers to plunder not just the bodies of humans but the body of the Earth itself. The Earth is not our creation. It has no respect for us. It has no use for us. And its vengeance is not the fire in the cities but the fire in the sky. Something more fierce than Marcus Garvey is riding on the whirlwind. Something more awful than all our African ancestors is rising with the seas. Our species risks its own extinction. But it is not our humanity that has brought us to the brink. Empire is the culprit. We know other ways to live.

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